Telecommuting Companies Galore

Telecommuting Companies Galore

As technology gives us the freedom to work from anywhere, more and more people are prizing the ability to do so. Many companies are responding with flexible work schedules, and seeming to acknowledge the trend, the Department of Labor just announced that in 2017 it will resume its contingent workforce survey, which was last conducted in 2005.

FlexJobs, an online service devoted to promoting telecommuting, flexible schedule, part-time and freelance work opportunities, is a prime resource for the segment of the workforce in search of such opportunities. While one might find many spam emails or subway flyers promising work from home opportunities, FlexJobs offers up legitimate and professional listings for jobs in 50 career categories with positions ranging from entry-level to C-suite.

Overall, the site saw a 36% increase in the number of remote listings, with computer and IT jobs topping the list of fields offering such opportunities, followed by medical and health, sales, administrative, customer service, education and training, and finally, marketing. Some of the most popular telecommuting jobs included writer, engineer, marketing manager, healthcare consultant, case manager, development director and recruiter.

“These companies clearly understand that integrating telecommuters into their workforce is a smart business strategy,” said Sara Sutton Fell, founder and CEO of FlexJobs, in a statement. “Remote working is on the rise, and this acceleration is great news for anyone wishing to trade the office for a telecommuting job.”

Here’s the top 10 list, plus tips at the bottom on ways to make more money:

  • LiveOps
  • TeleTech
  • Amazon
  • Sutherland Global Services
  • UnitedHealth Group
  • Dell
  • IBM
  • S. Department of Agriculture
  • Working Solutions
  • Humana

Ways to Stay Productive

  1. Define your spaces; separate work from home. Have a room dedicated to working. Don’t do it wherever you happen to be. Set aside some space, preferably a room (it doesn’t have to be big) to be your workspace. That way, when you enter it, you know consciously what you’re there to do: go to work. It changes the state of mind from “I’m at home” to “I’m at work”.
  2. Set regular hours, and stick to the schedule.
  3. Don’t stay unshaved in pajamas. Instead, have breakfast, have a shower, get dressed. Then make a list of sensible tasks for the day and get started.

4. Close the door. It’ll be very easy to leave the door to whatever room or space you set apart to be your workplace open. Don’t do it. If the door is open, that represents something to you, and to your family. To you, it represents the idea that if it’s a bit tough, or you don’t feel like working today, you don’t have to. To your family, it represents the idea that Dad is around, and I can go and talk to him.

Telecommuting Companies Galore Credit Picture License: Working Late via photopin cc